Snow and Southern Silliness

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snow pine treeWhat happens when a southerner hears the word snow? As a southern girl I know the answer to that. We over react, we over buy, and we over eat! Last night in my hometown we received two to three inches of snow. The meteorologist warned us for a week. The good town folks didn’t waste a minute buying up all the milk, bread, and fire wood.

This is not a new phenomenon. It was that way when I was a child in Tennessee. Part of the panic is because southern states are not equipped with snow plows and salt trucks.  We learn early on that snow means stay at home, stay warm, and stay full of food. Southern people do not have snow boots, down parkas, and toboggans (cap not sled). Since I mentioned sled, we didn’t have those either.

As kids, if we wanted to go outside and play in the snow we had to be creative. We didn’t have the right cold weather clothing or toys.  I remember putting on three pair of socks with my shoes and to keepfirewood my feet dry, I wrapped bread sacks around my shoes. That must have been a sight. We made our own sleds which were more like snow disks. We used garbage can lids or flattened brown boxes to slide down the hills. After thirty minutes of play, we were soaking wet, purple fingered, shivering, snotty red nosed, and worn out.

It has been my experience that most southerners love snow because in our lifetimes, we might only see four or five real snows (more than a dusting).  I do not fall into that category. I am a warm weather woman and if I never saw snow again it would be fine with me. But in case anyone wonders, I am prepared. I have plenty of bread and milk, plenty of fire wood, and yes, the crock pot is full of comfort food.

crockpotEnjoy the rare arctic blast, it might not happen again for a long time.

If y’all are out, stop by! You can leave your bread sack boots at the door and come on in! The fire is blazing, the food is hot, and the fun is just beginning.

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Sunday Supper

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grandpa jonesWhen I was growing up, we always watched Hee Haw on Saturday nights. Every week they would feature a Hey Grandpa, What’s for Supper? segment. http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=hee+haw+grandpa+what’s+for+supper&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=9A57899B6F0D3FCA12859A57899B6F0D3FCA1285

It was my favorite part of the show. Grandpa Jones would reel off a menu that included road kill and weird combinations of southern dishes. It made me giggle each time I watched him.

Tonight at our house, we are having a meal that might make Grandpa turn a backflip. We are having Carolina Pulled Pork, Butter Beans, Collard Greens, Fried Apples, Cornbread, Sweet Tea (of course!) and chocolate pie.

So, in keeping with tradition, I want to ask you, “Hey friend, what’s for supper?” All you have to do is enter it in the comment section and post. If you are planning a gourmet meal or Yankee food (heaven forbid), please give us a shout out. A good southern cook never turns down a creative menu, even from her Yankee friends. Recipes are welcome, too!

Happy eating, if you want to know how to cook any of the dishes I am having, let me know.   P.S. please help us gain readers. Pass this blog on to your friends and family.

The Great Chili Debate

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photo (4)What is the first meal you make when the temperature dips below 60 degrees? If you are like most southerners, you make a big ole pot of homemade chili. I’ve moved a lot and I learned quickly “the south” is extremely diverse when it comes to foods, traditions, and culture. There is a huge debate about chili.  What area of the south you live in, will determine what kind of chili you will make on a cold night.

In Texas, I understand (from transplanted Texans who are now Okies) they like their chili hot, with lots of meat (sometimes coarse ground beef or venison or both), thick sauce, lots of flavor, and NO beans.

In Oklahoma, we like it thick, made with lots of ground beef, a tomato type base, and beans. It is usually mild to medium.  As a former Tennessean, I am okay with both.

In Tennessee, the chili is like the Oklahoma version but a little more brothy and not so thick. Most of the time they pass the hot sauce to add a little heat. In my family the chili side dish was  always plain saltines.

When I was living in North Carolina, I was totally confused. In the Tarheel state, they put chili on hotdogs and hamburgers, both usually come with mustard, coleslaw and onions. This kind of Carolina chili is minus the beans, it is not saucy or hot, it is a sort of ground beef finely mashed with chili powder and spice flavoring.  If you want a burger or dog without chili you better tell them when you order. Chili is an unwritten code there, you order a hamburger or hotdog, it will come with chili. If you ask them to leave it off, I promise you, they will ask, “Are you sure?” Then, they will call all the cooks and kitchen help to your table so they can look at you, laugh, and ask you where you’re from.  They also serve chili in a bowl but that chili has beans and that dish is called “chili beans.” It is made like the Oklahoma kind.

In Alabama, they really threw me a curve. If you order a chili dog there, they will bring you a dog on a bun, some finely chopped ground beef on the dog, and they will hand you a bottle of Louisiana Hot Sauce or Texas Pete so youphoto (5) can turn ground beef into Alabama poor man’s version of chili. They also call chili with beans, “chili beans” and you eat it out of a bowl.

We lived in Florida for a total of ten years. I don’t think the temperature dropped below 60 degrees long enough for me to cook a pot of chili, maybe they eat it in the Florida panhandle but definitely not below the frost line.

What’s your chili preference? Send me you chili story, then we can all participate in the great chili debate.

Southern Sayin’ Saturday

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brisket sandwichWelcome to Bloggy Mountain Breakdown. Each Saturday, I hope to feature a Southern Sayin’. I am counting on you to send me your favorites. If you are looking for a blog where you can be involved this is the one for you. Let’s share our lives together. Enjoy the first sayin’!

A friend of mine went to TX this weekend and she enjoyed a delicious brisket slap ya mamasandwich on a yummy bun. This is what she said, “Very seldom do I get a brisket sandwich where the bun outshines the brisket … but I just had a “so good it’ll make you slap your mama” bun.

If you know the origin of this sayin’ enter it in the comments section. If you don’t know, make up a story…I think it might be fun!

Get your friends involved. This week because I like sayin’s, spices, and sandwiches, I am giving away a can of “Slap Ya Mama” Cajun seasoning. There will be a random drawing. I will post the winner on Monday.

*read the ABOUT section of the blog to find out how you can participate in Bloggy Mountain Breakdown.  

Homesick for Nashville

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It’s this time of year when I really get homesick for Nashville and the middle Tennessee area. Cooler temperatures, football, tailgate parties, clear blue skies, and changing colors remind me of my childhood. Someone asked me how Iflat and scruggs came up with the name for this blog. The title goes back to my roots. To put you in the southern frame of mind, click on the link below. This playin’ and  pickin’  will transport you to a kinder, gentler time. Enjoy… http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=foggy+mountain+breakdown&FORM=VIRE5#view=detail&mid=DE0E59FD5FDCC76F5A85DE0E59FD5FDCC76F5A85