Snow and Southern Silliness

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snow pine treeWhat happens when a southerner hears the word snow? As a southern girl I know the answer to that. We over react, we over buy, and we over eat! Last night in my hometown we received two to three inches of snow. The meteorologist warned us for a week. The good town folks didn’t waste a minute buying up all the milk, bread, and fire wood.

This is not a new phenomenon. It was that way when I was a child in Tennessee. Part of the panic is because southern states are not equipped with snow plows and salt trucks.  We learn early on that snow means stay at home, stay warm, and stay full of food. Southern people do not have snow boots, down parkas, and toboggans (cap not sled). Since I mentioned sled, we didn’t have those either.

As kids, if we wanted to go outside and play in the snow we had to be creative. We didn’t have the right cold weather clothing or toys.  I remember putting on three pair of socks with my shoes and to keepfirewood my feet dry, I wrapped bread sacks around my shoes. That must have been a sight. We made our own sleds which were more like snow disks. We used garbage can lids or flattened brown boxes to slide down the hills. After thirty minutes of play, we were soaking wet, purple fingered, shivering, snotty red nosed, and worn out.

It has been my experience that most southerners love snow because in our lifetimes, we might only see four or five real snows (more than a dusting).  I do not fall into that category. I am a warm weather woman and if I never saw snow again it would be fine with me. But in case anyone wonders, I am prepared. I have plenty of bread and milk, plenty of fire wood, and yes, the crock pot is full of comfort food.

crockpotEnjoy the rare arctic blast, it might not happen again for a long time.

If y’all are out, stop by! You can leave your bread sack boots at the door and come on in! The fire is blazing, the food is hot, and the fun is just beginning.

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